Strong Woman (Princess Diana)

In 1991, her husband, Prince Charles rekindled his romance with his true love, Camilla and a disillusioned Diana took the extraordinary risk of making her despair public.
She recorded her innermost thoughts for royal author Andrew Morton, on condition that her involvement be kept secret. The result was Diana, Her True Story, a best seller that shook the world. Two decades after her death in an auto crash, it is being republished with transcripts of Diana’s recordings. Daily Mail is publishing extracts and the revelations are just so sensational.
Read below:

The biggest disruption was when Mummy decided to leg it (in 1967). That’s the vivid memory the four of us children have. We all have our own interpretations of what should have happened and what did happen. People took sides. Various people didn’t speak to each other. For my brother and I, it was a very wishy-washy and painful experience.
Charles (my brother) said to me the other day that he hadn’t realised how much the divorce had affected him until he got married and started having a life of his own.
But my other sisters — their growing up was done out of our sight. We saw them at holidays. I don’t remember it being a big thing.

I idolised my eldest sister (Sarah, six years older) and I used to do all her washing when she came back from school. I packed her suitcase, ran her bath, made her bed — the whole lot. I did it all and I thought it was wonderful. I soon learned that doing that wasn’t such a good idea.
I always looked after my brother, really. We had so many changes of nannies, because Daddy was a very attractive divorcee and he was good bait for somebody. We tend to think they came for that, rather than for looking after my brother and me.
If we didn’t like them, we used to stick pins in their chair and throw their clothes out of the window. We always thought they were a threat because they tried to take mother’s position.
They were all very young and rather pretty. They were chosen by my father. It was terribly disruptive to come back from school one day to find a new nanny.
It was a very unhappy childhood. Always seeing our mum crying. Daddy never spoke to us about it — we could never ask questions. Very unstable, the whole thing.
At the age of 14, I remember thinking that I wasn’t very good at anything, that I was hopeless because my brother was always the one getting exams at school and I was the dropout.

I couldn’t understand why I was perhaps a nuisance to have around, which in later years I’ve perceived as being part of the whole question of the child who died before me. It was a son (John, who died within ten hours of his birth in 1960) and both my parents were crazy to have a son and heir. ‘What a bore, we’re going to have to try again.’ And then comes a third daughter.
I’ve recognised that now and that’s fine. I accept it.
I adored animals, guinea-pigs and all that. I had a mass of rabbits, guinea-pigs and hamsters. They all had names.
In my bed, I’d have 20 stuffed animals and there would be a midget’s space for me. They were all adored. That was my family.

I hated the dark — always had to have a light outside my door until I was at least ten. I used to hear my brother crying for my mother — he was unhappy, too — and my father was right down the other end of the house. I never could pluck up courage to get out of bed. I remember it to this day.
I remember seeing my father slap my mother across the face. I was hiding behind the door, and Mummy was crying. I remember Mummy crying an awful lot. Every Saturday, when we went up (to stay with her and Peter Shand Kydd) for weekends, every Saturday night, standard procedure, she would start crying. We would both see her crying. ‘What’s the matter, Mummy?’
‘Oh, I don’t want you to leave tomorrow,’ — which, for a nine-year-old, was devastating, you know.
I remember the most agonising decision I ever had to make. I was a bridesmaid to my first cousin, and to go to the rehearsal I had to be smart and wear a dress. And my mother gave me a green dress and my father had given me a white dress.
And they were both so smart, the dresses, and I can’t remember to this day which one I wore. But I remember being totally traumatised by it because it would show favouritism.

I remember there being a great discussion that a judge was going to come to me at Riddlesworth (my preparatory school) and ask who I would prefer to live with. The judge never turned up.
Basically, we couldn’t wait to be independent, Charles and I, in order to spread our wings and do our own thing.

We had become horribly different at school because we had divorced parents, and nobody else did at that time. But by the time we finished our five years at prep school, everybody was.
I always had this thing inside me that I was different. I didn’t know why. I couldn’t even talk about it, but it was there.

The divorce helped me to relate to anyone else who is upset in their family life, whether it be stepfather syndrome or mother or whatever, I understand it. Been there, done it.
We were always shunted over to Sandringham (the Queen’s Norfolk residence next door) for holidays. We used to go and see Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, the film.
We hated it so much. The atmosphere was always very strange, and I used to kick and fight anyone who tried to make us go over there. I said I didn’t want to see Chitty Chitty Bang Bang for the third year running. Daddy was most insistent because it was rude (not to go).

Holidays were always very grim because, say, we had a four-week holiday: two weeks Mummy and two weeks Daddy, and the trauma of going from one house to another, and each individual parent trying to make it up in their area with material things rather than the actual tactile stuff, which is what we both craved but never got . . .

Birthdays were obviously a treat. My father once organised a dromedary to come along and give us rides around the lawn — he got it from Bristol Zoo. Birthdays were always a good time. Daddy loves parties.
But there was still none of the arms round the shoulder, or hugging. It was always the other things. I always wanted a pram for my birthday — and dolls. I was fiendish about the dolls and the prams.
And I collected pieces of china. All sorts of fairytale things, and tiny little rabbits. I mean, anything that was small was wonderful, as far as I was concerned.

Being naughty at prep school was fun
Actually, I loved being at school. Although, because I was busy looking after my father most of the time, and then suddenly realised I was going to be away from him (back at school), I used to make threats like: ‘If you love me, you won’t leave me here,’ which was jolly unkind to him at the time.
I was very naughty in the sense of always wanting to laugh and muck about rather than sit tight in the four walls of the schoolroom.

I remember school plays and the thrill of putting on make-up. I was a Dutch doll or something like that. My big moment. But I never put myself forward to speak in a play. I never read the lessons at school. If I was asked to do anything, my condition was I’d do it if I didn’t have to speak.
My first sporting cup was for diving. I won it four years running, actually! I always won all the swimming and diving cups. I won all sorts of prizes for the best-kept guinea-pig — maybe because mine was the only guinea-pig in the guinea-pig section.
But in the academic department, you might as well forget about that!
At school, we were only allowed one animal on the bed. I had a green hippo and painted his eyes luminous, so that at night it looked as though he was looking at me.
The dare that nearly got me expelled
I nearly got expelled — I must have been 11 or 12 — because one night somebody said to me: ‘Would you like to do a dare?’ I thought: ‘Why not? Life’s so boring.’

So they sent me out at 9 o’clock to the end of the drive, which was half a mile long, in pitch dark. I had to go and get some sweets at the gate from somebody called Polly Phillimore, I think she was called. I got there and there was nobody there. I hid behind the gate as these police cars were coming in.
I thought nothing more about it. I saw all the lights coming on in the school. I wandered back, terrified, to find that some twit in my bedroom said that she had appendicitis.

Then they asked ‘Where’s Diana?’ ‘I don’t know where she’s gone.’
Both my parents were summoned — they were divorced by then. Father was thrilled and my mother said: ‘I didn’t think you had it in you.’ No telling-off.

Why I never had any boyfriends
There was an enormous hall which they had just built on (at West Heath school, in Sevenoaks, Kent). I used to sneak down at night when it was all dark, and put on my music and do my ballet there in this enormous hall for hours on end, and no one ever found me.

All my friends knew where I was when I crept out, and it always released tremendous tension in my head.
I liked all subjects. History fascinated me. Tudors and Stuarts — I adored them. I never anticipated I’d end up in the system, in the books.
In English, I loved Far From The Madding Crowd and Pride And Prejudice. But in O-levels, you were so besieged with every single line that it became a chore rather than a pleasure. I took five — I got Ds for the lot. That’s not even a pass.
If I could study a subject now, it would be about people. The mind. Definitely the mind. I’d love to study psychology.

(At school) I played the piano. I did my tap dancing, which I absolutely adored; tennis, and I was captain of the netball team, hockey, you name it, because of my height. I was one of the tallest there.

I visited old people once a week, went to the local mental asylum once a week (Darenth Park, a large psychiatric hospital near Dartford). I adored that. It was sort of an introduction for bigger things.
Then, by the time I got to the top of the school, all my friends had boyfriends but not me, because I knew somehow that I had to keep myself very tidy for whatever was coming my way.

I had more girlfriends than boyfriends. I was always mucking about with girls. But I didn’t really have any friends that stuck.
I had crushes, serious crushes on all sorts of people, especially my sisters’ boyfriends. If they ever got chucked out from that department, I used to try my way.

Moving to Althorp was such a wrench
When I was 13, we moved to Althorp in Northampton (her father had become Earl Spencer in 1975 and inherited the estate.)
That was a terrible wrench, leaving Norfolk, because that’s where everybody who I’d grown up with lived. We had to move because grandfather died.

And life took a very big turn because my stepmother, Raine, appeared on the scene. (Then aged 46 and married to the Earl of Dartmouth, Raine was the daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland.)

We all hated her so much because we thought she was going to take Daddy away from us. She was very clever and she wanted to marry Daddy; that was her target and that was it.
I’ve sat and boiled for years and years, and two Septembers ago (1989) my brother got married (to model Victoria Lockwood) and I told Raine what I thought about her — and I’ve never known such anger in me.
It’s because my stepmother and my father were very rude to my mother at the rehearsal before my brother’s wedding; they refused to speak to her, even while sitting next to her on a pew.

I thought that just for one day, for the sake of my brother, we could all be grown-up and get on with it. I just thought it was unbelievable.
So I took it upon myself to air everyone’s grievances in my family. And it was very difficult. My father didn’t speak to me for six months. Raine doesn’t speak to me now (although later they were to get on very well).

But I stuck up for Mummy, and my mother said that was the first time in 22 years anyone had ever stuck up for her.

I said everything I possibly could. Raine said: ‘You have no idea how much pain your mother has put your father through.’
I said: ‘Pain, Raine? That’s one word you don’t even know how to relate to. In my job and in my role (as Princess of Wales), I see people suffer like you’ve never seen — and you call that pain? You’ve got a lot to learn.’
I remember really going for her gullet — I was so angry.
I said: ‘I hate you so much. If only you knew how much we all hated you for what you’ve done. You’ve ruined the house, you spend Daddy’s money and what for?’ (Raine had embarked on a lavish redecoration of Althorp and sold off numerous paintings, antiques and other objets d’art.)
Daddy’s stroke left him a different man.

He had a brain haemorrhage (in 1978). He’d suffered headaches, took Disprins, told nobody.
They said: ‘He’s going to die.’ The brain had ruptured. And we saw another side of Raine which we hadn’t anticipated, as she basically blocked us out of the hospital; she wouldn’t let us see Daddy.

My eldest sister took charge of that and went in sometimes to see him. Meanwhile, he couldn’t talk because he had a tracheotomy, so he wasn’t able to ask where his other children were.

Goodness knows what he was thinking, because no one was telling him. Anyway, he got better and he basically changed character. He was one person before and he was certainly a different person afterwards. He’s remained estranged but adoring since.
He’s not the same since he had that haemorrhage.
I treat people nicely — even the gardener.
My father always said: ‘Treat everybody as an individual and never throw your weight around.’ I always got on very well with everybody. Whether it be the gardener or the local police or whoever, I always went over to talk to them.

My father used to sit us down every Christmas and birthday, and we had to write our thank-you letters within 24 hours. And now if I don’t, I get into a panic.

If I come back from a dinner party or somewhere that needs a letter, at midnight I’ll sit down and write it there — and not wait until next morning because it would wrestle with my conscience. William now does it — it’s great. It’s nice if other people appreciate it at the other end.
My brother’s clever, but not with people.

I’ve always seen him as the brains in the family. I still see that. He’s got S-levels, and things like that. But if you’re talking about how to deal with situations and how to deal with people — no.

I think that my brother, being the youngest and the only boy, was quite precious because Althorp is a big place.

I longed to be as good as Charles in the schoolroom. I was never jealous of him. I so understood him.
He’s quite mature in some ways; he’s quite immature in others. But that’s to be expected — for God’s sake, the boy’s only 28.

He’s very like me, as opposed to my two sisters. He will always suffer, Charles, because he’s like me — whereas my two sisters are blissfully happy being detached.
Finishing school was such a waste of money.

I know that when I went to finishing school (The Institut Alpin Videmanette in Switzerland, in 1977) I wrote something like 120 letters in the first month. I was so unhappy there — I just wrote and wrote and wrote.
I felt out of place there. I learnt how to ski, but I wasn’t very good with everybody else. It was just too claustrophobic for me, albeit it was in the mountains.

I did one term there. When I found out how much it cost to send me there, I told my parents it was a waste of their money. So they whipped me back.
My parents said: ‘You can’t come to London until you are 18. You can’t have a flat until you are 18.’
So I went and worked with a family in Headley, near Bordon in Hampshire — Philippa and Jeremy Whitaker. I looked after their one daughter, Alexandra, and lived as part of their team.

It was all right. But I was itching to go to London because I thought the grass was greener on the other side.

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DILEMMA OF A DEPUTY- By Isyaku Dikko

I know the problems of a deputy because I was once a deputy and later a leader with a controversial deputy. As a deputy or vice, if you work hard people will say you are very ambitious, and if you slow down, they will say you are sabotaging your boss. Unfortunately, many bosses are suspicious of their deputies.

The problems of a deputy are largely associated with personalization of power. Instead of perceiving public office as a privilege to serve, it is perceived as an elevation to a higher social status, where power and authority are personal to the person who occupies an office. This makes the boss suspicious of anybody perceived to be encroaching his “territorial integrity”.

Framers of the 1999 constitution were quite aware of the occasional tension in the relationship between bosses and their deputies, therefore, denied vice president and deputy governors specific roles, other than the one’s assigned to them by their bosses. They are called spare tyres, but spare tyres cannot function in any capacity until the original tyre is not usable. In the case of deputy governors and vice president, their offices were specifically designed to complement the offices of their bosses and function at the same time with the bosses. This relationship is an opportunity for political tutelage. How can you train somebody for four or eight years, and throw him away at a time when he should be good enough to take over from you? Are you acknowledging your failure to train him good enough to succeed you? Isn’t it an irony that of the over one hundred deputy governors produced in Nigeria from 1998 to date, only two (Zamfara and Kano) succeed their bosses?

If we were a nation that takes research and political engineering seriously, we would have long ago found out why chief executives fear handing over to their deputies, and correct the anomaly so that trained deputy governors will not be wasted. This requires serious research because even the two governors that handed over to their deputies fell out with them and appear to be sworn-enemies.

It is often argued that most governors go for weak deputies to avoid challenges, therefore, found the deputies too weak to take over from them. This may be true in some cases, but certainly there were many good deputies. We can avoid the tragedy of a tragic deputy by being confident as leaders, aware of the fact that the mandate and the power are yours. Interestingly, the pattern is changing with a professor of biochemistry as deputy governor in Kano State, professor of political science and former Vice Chancellor of UNIJOS as deputy governor in Plateau State.

I was reluctant to write about the tenure of Professor Yemi Osinbajo as Acting President because it should be a simple administrative procedure, until I read the article of Col. Abubakar Dangiwa Umar in the Daily Trust of Friday, March 3, 2017 (Deft moves of Acting President Yemi Osinbajo). One thing I like about Dangiwa Umar is that he always intervene on the side of Nigeria. The point is that responsible Nigerians must always come out, take a position on national issues and push it, especially on contentious issues, otherwise, some reckless Nigerians will take over the driver’s seat of Nigeria and drive us recklessly to perdition.

To begin with, to accept and respect Professor Osinbajo is to respect the decision of God who gives power to whom He pleases. Equally important, President Muhammadu Buhari, is aware of the provisions of the constitution of the country when he picked Osinbajo. The message of Buhari is simple and clear: “In my absence, this man will be your leader. If at any time my creator decides to call me, he is your president”.

The dilemma of a deputy is more apparent when you are a pastor and a professor, who professes. In all the two capacities, you are expected to serve humanity diligently because that is what you chose by opting to be a man of God and an intellectual. And just as you step out to answer your name, some people started shouting: “This man is ambitious, stop him!”. You look around and ask yourself: What is my calling? Is it not to serve humanity? Is this not an opportunity to serve humanity?

Undoubtedly, Professor Osinbajo has done well and deserves commendation. For me, the assessment of a leader starts with whether he is a “philosopher king” or an ordinary person who cannot see beyond the horizon of his ordinary country men and women, therefore, cannot be a pathfinder or custodian of the future.

Philosophical leaders are known for their philosophical thought, philosophical statements, and coherent interventions. Osinbajo was at his best recently, during a civil service function, where he said, civil service is a call to service, a privilege to serve “and if you miss this, you have missed the point”. Period. This statement resonates more than a 500-page book on how to reform civil service in Nigeria. Also, consider the statement of the Acting President to some protesters. He said: “To those who are protesting… we hear you loud and clear. You deserve a decent life and we are working night and day to make life easier”.

There is no point arguing on who takes the credit of the impressive performance of Osinbajo. Nobody should. Not even Osinbajo. If you think that public service is about credit, not service to humanity, “you have missed the point”, to use the words of Osinbajo.

But it is legitimate to ask: what satisfaction should Osinbajo and Buhari draw from the performance of Osinbajo. For Osinbajo it is obvious. The joy of serving humanity and not disappointing your boss cannot be quantified. He is also a good ambassador of his religious and professional constituencies. Nobody will say: what is the point in making a pastor or a professor a president, when one of them failed as Acting President?

President Buhari should be elated that his decision to handover to his vice has vindicated him. This is how it should be. The presidency is for public service, and whoever finds himself in-charge of the office is to be pre-occupied with public service, not personal glory. Also, Buhari’s policy of picking “quality materials” as vice, says much about his self-confidence and passion for Nigeria. The two people he picked in the past to deputise for him, Major General Tunde Idiagbon and Pastor Tunde Bakare, are among the best Nigerians one can find.

We wish President Buhari quick recovery so that he will come back home and continue with the good work he started. The mandate is his.

Publish Date: March 8 2017.

WHY DIFFERENT LANGUAGES AND RACES IF GOD REALLY WANT US TO STAY UNITED?- Part 3

{last part}

ABOUT RACES
The pigment primarily responsible for everyone’s skin colour is melanin. Ultimately, everyone has the same skin colour- we just have varying skin tones. The two forms of melanin are eumelanin (brown to black) and pheomelanin (red to yellow). Their proportion determines skin tone.

So what would cause some people to have very dark skin while others’ skin is lighter? WHERE THEY LIVE MAKES A DIFFERENCE. For example, darker skin on people living in regions near the equator protects them from intense sunlight, reducing their risk of skin cancer. I guess it’s a kind of a self-defensive mechanism from the skin. People in higher latitudes where there is less intense sunlight need lighter skin to produce vitamin-D efficiently.

As people continue to spread, occupying varying regions, those who could not cope probably died or move out. Over many generations, these favorable characteristics became imprinted or carried in the gene pool, and the less favourable characteristics will be gradually displaced from the gene pool in the struggle for survival. Thus genetic variability between isolated population gradually diminished, hence achieving a kind of a more nearly uniformed gene characteristic as exhibited by same/similar races today.

Gradually as it is today, people with very light skin will give birth to light-skinned children, while people with very dark skin will usually give birth to dark-skinned children.

However, people with “middle brown” skin often have children with a much wider range of skin tones. Why? Because these “middle brown” people groups still have significant genetic variability with regard to skin tone.

Based on our understanding of the inheritance of skin tone, we strongly suspect Adam and Eve were middle brown. This would give the widest range of skin tones in their offspring, from very light to very dark.

We live in dangerous times. The lessons of babel have been forgotten. Arrogant leaders dare to do anything in the world today. And people excitedly jump on the bandwagon. And it seems that nothing whips up enthusiasm as much as some grandiose plan to unify all mankind into some great, worldwide empire. Think of the organizations that work to such an end: The United Nations, The World Trade Organization, the World Bank, and NATO. And there are so many others with similar agenda. But in Genesis 11:1-9, God makes it clear that the world will never enjoy real unity, except when they find it through Him. He is the Way, the Truth and the Light.

I’m glad I was able to share it all… 🙂

Have a beautiful day/night!!

THE 20TH CENTURY

The 20th Century’s Progress…

“Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have too many men of science; too few men of Sermon on the mount. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we do about peace. We are always ready for war, than we are ready to make peace. We know more about killing than we do about living. This is what our century is boasting about… This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and progress.”- Unknown

I wonder: why is it so hard to make peace and to love, yet easier to incite and make war? Why is it also easy to manipulate each other against other regions, religions, races, tribes and ethnic groups?

Today, huge investments are made towards making and importing more sophisticated- guns, explosives, cars, phones, expensive jewelleries/clothings, etc. Rather than using these resources to produces enough- food, clean water, health facilities, affordable & standard education, and other necessities that will greatly enhanced life to glorify God. We create things we can live without to destroy/replace things we can’t live without. Can we survive without cars, jewelleries or guns? On the other hand: Can we survive without food and water?

The world still needs to look deep, think deep and find out Why we (ordinary mortals) have decided to take the place of God in the lives of our fellow men; to dictate who lives or dies? These days, the man with the gun is the bravest but in reality, the bravest men are those who instead of destroying more lives have found it more honourable to undergo all kinds of tortures (physically, mentally and spiritually) to save at least a single life. Some were assassinated and some even to the point of being crucified after undergoing various kinds of painful experiences from both friends and foes.

Every soul on earth, carries with it a great destiny. And to kill one, is to destroy the healing that such a soul has brought to heal that part of the world he was sent by the Creator to heal, comfort and transform. Respect every single life!

One’s religion,tribe, race or country is not necessarily a criteria for being good, but the content of one’s heart. That is why every religion, tribe, race or nation have both good and bad people. We can only chose which side we want to belong. I think there are basically two kinds of people on earth regardless of any religion or race:

1) The Good-Hearted-people
2) The Evil- Hearted-people

We’ve fallen so much in love with the desire to be in power and control other people that we lose connection with our heart which is the centre of our existence (Proverbs 4:23).

So, we should never allow ourselves to look down on other people’s beliefs, religion, race, country, etc. Because if we are good enough, people will admire us enough to learn something from us without having to force, intimidate or cause unnecessary wars. If I claim I’m good fine, but me always criticising your religion is not what will make me good, but what God will say of me when I’m finally gone (dead).

The most casualties in wars are children and mothers who are the most innocent. If you’ve never experience it or fallen a victim, you’ll NEVER COMPLETELY understand. But you can feel it closely, if your heart can feel other’s pains without necessarily being them.

May we never be misled or manipulated into turning against each other just because of some differences. That we all have the same image of One Creator is enough similarity to overcome our differences. Let GOD be our main focus and Judge, not we or the world.

Have a Nice Day!!

-Egba Terry

JUST LIVE!

JUST LIVE…

When I’m afraid to say or do something that I feel is important to me, and which may benefit me and others, I ask myself “Of What Importance Is It If You Keep It And Take It To The Grave?”

Somebody may not agree with what you have to say, or what you have to offer or do, but we don’t have to look at it at just today. Many People are yet to be born. Maybe they are the ones that would benefit most from some of these efforts. Let’s do it at least for their sake.

Most of the things we are enjoying today were not accepted at their initial stage, yet others have had to overcome so many difficulties, to ensure that we have them today.

So do whatever good you have to do while you still have the chance. How many people in today’s world, would be lucky enough to travel successfully across two centuries? We all have limited time on this earth and every second that passes, is gone forever, yeah, every passing second is like “One Second Older and not One Second Younger.”

Live, Live and Live until Life finally Leaves.

Have a beautiful weekend!

THE DEMON NAMED CORRUPTION

CORRUPTION…

Corruption is a demon and the cause of so many sufferings and hunger in the world today. Even those who want to fight it end up getting hooked in one way or the other by the tricky-evil claws of this beast called corruption.

The problem with me and perhaps some other persons out there is that; whenever the word ‘corruption’ is mentioned, we begin to look far away from our immediate environment and begin to quickly point at the politicians and other authorities. It’s not wrong though, but it’s fairer if we begin from ourselves and our immediate environment and how we’re managing the little POWER given to us to manage people and other non-human resources at our disposal especially where financing of projects is involve. Where the POWER to appoint people for various post of responsibilities rests on our shoulders. Let’s first examine ourselves. If we are at fault, let’s admit it. That’s the first stage towards repentance from such evil. The next thing is to make up our minds to resist the temptation whenever it comes, for God’s sake.

This will now place us in a better position to criticize any other person constructively.

Corruption has been found to be associated with many political office holders and those in authority because they have been given the higher or highest POWER to control, manage and protect the nation’s resources (both human & non-human resources). POWER indeed intoxicates, but true leaders are never power-drunk because they know that POWER belongs to the PEOPLE and not the other way around. Wise leaders understand that to oppose the PEOPLE when in POWER is like fighting POWER itself and the PEOPLE always have the highest votes and so the PEOPLE always WIN whenever they decide to push aside their differences, sentiments, party affiliations and hold a common ground to agree and vote in the candidate of their choice. To vote the best candidate, the people need ask God for the wisdom and forsight to know which candidate has their best intentions at heart (not just at the mouth)

WHY DOES CORRUPTION AT THE POINT OF DYING, BOUNCES BACK TO ANOTHER FORM??! This directs us to the next question: What Is The Modus Operandi Of Corruption? O. P. Sharma in one of his books outlined some of these causes in paragraphs but I’ll number them for clarity.

Indeed there are numerous ways in which the monster of corruption manages to sneak into the mind of man and induces him to depart from the path of nobility. Below are some notable sources of corruption:

1) BUSINESS & POLITICS: Democracy is indeed the best form of government in this modern times. But huge sums of money are usually needed to fight an election or for campaigns, which hardly any candidate can afford. Naturally, a person with political ambitions & little money turns to a businessman to finance his election battle. Success of the candidate would now pave way for the businessman to amass a vast fortune by cashing in on the influence of this successful candidate. This can also be applicable to political parties that receive donations in several forms. If a politician who owe his electoral success to a business house, says that he will not dole out patronage to it after assuming a key position in government, he is plainly indulging in myth making.

No doubt there are some politicians who win elections without the support of big-business houses, but their number is negligible. Without measures to reduce election expenses & delink business-and-politics, the hope of rooting out corruption is just a wishful thinking.

2) LACK OF INTEGRITY AMONG POLICE OFFICIALS: Edward Sullivan believes that
crime is the result of collusion between a politician & policeman. His following comment is revealing, “actually organized crime could not exist if it were not fostered by corrupt politicians & corrupt police.”

Preaching sermons can never make the police lovers of integrity. Pragmatic steps should be taken. There can be no better solution than the provision of adequate salary & housing facilities, particularly for the staff at lower level. If the evil still persists despite adequate salaries, exemplary punishment should be meted out to erring persons.

3) CHANGE IN VALUES OF LIFE: People have generally become indifferent to spiritualism and austerity. Craze for the enjoyment of fantastic material comforts is in evidence everywhere. When people can’t get it through honest means, they turn to dubious means. Malpractices like hoarding & adulteration produce instant results in swelling their coffers. No doubt while doing this, they have to suppress the voice of their conscience. As a matter of fact, talent and virtue have to pay homage to the deity of affluence. This process must be reversed before we reach the stage of no return.

To protect ourselves from the baneful effects of riches we must bear in mind that talent & virtue are always superior to wealth.

Fight the demon & reveal the angel that you are!

– Egba Terry Ottase

Have a Beautiful Day!!